ENG 1101 Course Expectations, Assignments, and Course Outcomes and Competencies

Sinclair Community College English Department

Course Expectations, Assignments, and Course Outcomes and Competencies

ENG 1101 
11 August 2014
 
Overall Department Expectations:

·         Assignments will be consistent with or comparable to the choices of assignments listed below and in the classroom repository. (Summary writing must be assigned; only one primarily narrative essay should be assigned.)

·         Grammar will be taught ad hoc, in the context of the papers assigned.

·         Formal academic writing will constitute the main content of the course.

·         At least 80% of the course grades will be based on writing; at least 20 pages of formal writing will be assigned and evaluated.

·         Drafts and revisions are required.

·         Peer review will be an activity in the course.

·         Group work will be an activity in the course.

·         Self-assessment will be taught and used in the course.

·         There will be an oral component in the course (informal or formal)

·         Graded essays will be pc-printed or electronically submitted.

·         Formal essays will be 3+ pages long.

·         Literary analysis is an option for one essay.

·         Introduction to research and documentation will be included.

·         Instructors will help students use Angel, including saving files to the Toolbox

 

English Department Guiding Principles on Grading:

·         Writing grades should account for at least 80 percent of a student’s grade in 1101 and 1201.

·         Rubrics are useful tools, but they are not a substitute for formative and substantive comments by an instructor.

·         Grades are not used as punitive incentives; rather, a grade on a particular piece of writing reflects where that piece currently stands on the spectrum of possible grades (A-F). For instance, if a paper is a B paper and could be revised to an A, it should receive a B, not a lower grade to encourage revision.

·         A single criterion should not account for a grade on a given paper. For instance, a poor thesis will likely result in poor supports. Those are two criteria for grading and would result in a lower grade. Missing one support of a thesis is one criterion and wouldn’t necessarily tank a paper, but would be an opportunity for revision of the paper.

·         The law of diminishing returns applies to commenting on student papers – too much commenting can result in overloading the student and wasting your time. Comment on the major issues and address the rest in student conferences.

 


 

Below are three sets of assignments that would meet our department criteria.

Refer also to the Repository for more teaching resources and please share your own ideas with others.

 

Assignments that would meet the Course Objectives and Competencies and the 20-page minimum:

Class participation and attendance

10%

1 narrative essay (3 pages)

15%

1 comparison essay (4 pages)

15%

1 analysis essay (3 pages)

15%

1 argument essay based on research (4 pages)

20%

1 summary (1 page)

10%

1 mid-term self-assessment (1 page)

5%

1 end of term self-assessment (2 pages)

5%

3 peer review responses (3 pages total)

5%
 
 
Class participation and attendance
10%
1 literacy narrative/memoir (3 pages)
10%
1 textual analysis (3 pages)
20%
1 summary (1 page)
5%
1 research proposal (2 pages)
5%
1 annotated bibliography (3-5 pages)
10%
1 researched argument (5 pages)
30%
1 self-assessment memo (1 page)
5%
3 peer review responses (3 pages)
5%
 

 

 

Class participation and attendance

5%

1 literacy narrative/memoir (3 pages)

10%
1 movie analysis (3 pages)
15%
1 Summary (1 page)
5%
1 literary analysis (4 pages)
20%
1 research proposal (2 pages)
5%
1 researched argument (5 pages)
30%
1 self-assessment memo (1 page)
5%
3 peer review responses (3 pages)
5%
 


 

Course Outcomes and Competencies for ENG 1101:

Competency Areas English I

The student should be able to: 

 

Recursive academic reading and writing process 

·         Identify a thesis, main and supporting points in an article

·         Survey/Preview a text

·         Navigate the textbook

·         Identify audience, genre, and purpose of an article/writing

·         Recognize and demonstrate the recursive writing process (invention, drafting, revision, editing)

·         Comment substantively on writing elements of peer drafts

 
 

Audience awareness (thesis, organization, cohesion)

 

·         Demonstrate AUDIENCE awareness in own writing

·         Revise for coherence and organization to enhance readability

·         Distinguish between informal and formal registers of language use and choose appropriate register for different audiences  and purposes.

 

Analysis and evaluation of texts (literary, rhetorical, visual, etc.)

·         Recognize patterns of organization used in a text

·         Identify intended audience and purpose in a text

·         Evaluate whether the author had achieved his or her intended purpose.

 

Introduction to logic and argumentation

 

·         Understand basic logical flaws

·         Support an argument thesis with logical reasons and evidence

·         Concede to or refute counterarguments

 
 

Introduction to working with academic sources (annotating, summarizing, paraphrasing, direct quotation)

·         Annotate readings effectively

·         Distinguish between claim and evidentiary support

·         Summarize, paraphrase, and quote correctly and appropriately to avoid plagiarism in a composition

 

Introduction to research and basics of documentation

·         Articulate the purpose of academic research in the broader community

·         Find appropriate source(s) to use in a composition

·         Demonstrate a preliminary understanding of Modern Language Association documentation format

 

Reflecting/connecting personal, academic, and public writing

 

·         Understand and choose appropriate point of view (first, second, third) for different audiences and purposes.

·         Reflect meaningfully on personal and societal effects of readings and their own writing

 

Editing and working in electronic environments

·         Edit and proofread documents for improved sentence style and to avoid (especially major) errors (e.g. sentence boundaries, verb form/tense, etc.)

·         Apply or develop document retrieval and file organization skills.

·         Use word processing and/or other tools

 
 

Grading Standards of the English Department for ENG 1101 and 1201

Characteristics of an A paper:  Polished, outstanding college-level work.

The A essay shows originality of thought in stating and developing a central idea.

            The ideas are clear, logical, and thought-provoking.

            The essay exhibits the positive qualities of good writing.

 

Characteristics of a B paper:  Above average college-level work.

The B essay has a clearly stated central idea, logically and adequately developed.

            The essay exhibits some of the positive qualities of good writing.

Although the writing is above average, the B essay lacks the excellence of thought, development, and style which characterizes the A essay.

 

Characteristics of a C paper: Average college-level work.

The C essay has a reasonably clear central idea with fairly adequate development and support.

The essay exhibits some of the positive qualities of good writing:

The C essay may, in fact, have few correction marks on it, but it lacks the quality of thought development, and expression which would entitle it to an above average rating.

 

Characteristics of an unacceptable paper: Does not meet more than one requirement of the assignment
and shows little or no revision. Below average college-level work.

The central idea is unclear or incomplete. It may lack adequate development and support. The essay lacks several of the positive qualities of good writing and has errors that impede meaning.